Wednesday, 27 April 2016

Say Not Struggle Naught Availeth: SHORT ANSWER QUESTIONS

What idea/ theme is presented in the poem “Say Not Struggle Naught Availeth”?
OR
“Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth” is a poem which reflects hope. Discuss.
The poet expresses the idea that we should never think that our efforts are useless and that they have no effect on the enemy. By giving some examples he proves that every effort has its effect, although sometimes it so happens that the results of our labour do not come out immediately; however, it does not mean that our efforts go in vain. Therefore, we should continue our efforts and continue to hope and never feel disappointed.

Describe the three images Arthur Hugh Clough presented in his poem.
OR
How does the writer explain his view-point?
OR
Ceaseless effort is indispensable to touch the border of success. Support your answer with reference to “Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth”.
The poet stresses the idea that every effort has its effect, although sometimes does not seem so; however, it does not mean that our efforts go in vain. He presents three examples to emphasize his point.
The first example is that of a battle-field. Sometimes it so happens that a section of the army gets beyond the smoke of the guns and wins the field by chasing the enemy, while their companions fear that they have been killed. The second example is that of the waves of the ocean striking against the shores violently, yet they seem not to gain an inch. But after some time we find that these waves have made creeks and inlets at some distance, through which the water of the ocean comes flooding in quietly. The third example is that of sun-rise. Although the sun rises in the east, it is not only through the eastern windows that the sun-light comes in. If we notice, we find that when the sun climbs high, its light spreads in all directions and it enters our rooms even from the western sides.
Therefore, we should continue our efforts and never feel disappointed. We may not know the effect of our efforts immediately; however, every effort has its effect. Success does not come only from the expected corners. It may also come from other sides unexpectedly.

In the poem, what examples does the poet give in the last two stanzas to prove his point?
In the Second last stanza the poet gives the example of a man, watching the tide coming in, On the beach the waves do not seen to be advancing. But, behind the watcher, the water comes rushing back into the sea.
And in the last stanza the poet presents the picture of a man, watching the rising sun. Looking towards the east, he sees the sun climbing very slowly however it is not only that the east brightens up, the west brightens up too and soon the sunrise overcomes the darkness all over the horizon.
The point which the poet wants to emphases is that struggle never goes unrewarded and it might come from unexpected directions.

What are the three examples that the poet gives in Say Naught the Struggle not Availeth?
The first example is that of a battle-field. Sometimes we do not step on the battle-field because we are afraid of losing; but when after overcoming our fear we enter into the field, we find many companions already there fighting and with our help they succeed and chase the enemy away.             

The second example is that of the waves of an ocean striking against the shores violently, yet it seems that they are not able to make their way into the land. But after some time we find that these waves have made creeks and inlets at some distance, through which the water of the ocean comes flooding in quietly.

The third example is that of sun-rise. Although the sun rises in the east, it is not only through the eastern windows that the sun-light comes in. When the sun climbs high, its light spreads in all directions and it brightens the western side of the sky too.

What message has been conveyed in the poem, Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth?
The poet expresses the idea that we should never think that our efforts are useless and that they have no effect on the enemy. Through examples of battle-field, tides and sun-rise, he proves that every effort has its effect, although sometimes it so happens that the results of our labour do not come out immediately; however, it does not mean that our efforts go in vain. Therefore, we should keep on struggling and keep on hoping for the fruit of our struggle. We should never feel disappointed.

Explain the lines:
For while the tired waves, vainly breaking,
Seem here no painful inch to gain,
Far back, through creeks and inlets making
Comes silent, flooding in the main.
In the lines, the poet refers to the changing position of the sea. The poet says that the noisy waves of ocean go on striking the sea shore. Apparently, these violent waves do not work. These waves do not break any land. If one views the tide coming in, he sees the waves not advancing. Actually, the water brings cracks in the land steadily. The water finds its way gradually. A time comes when the violent waves break everything what so ever comes in their way. In the same way, our long persistent struggle also bears some fruit. However, we feel the sense of achievement at a later stage.

Explain the lines:
And not by eastern windows only,
When daylight comes, comes in the light;
In front the sun climbs slow, how slowly,
But westward, look, the land is bright!

In the lines, the poet presents the situation of sun-rise. He says that in the beginning, while rising in the East, the Sun brightens the West only. The Sun slowly rises on the horizon. Its light begins to brighten up the world. The poet proves his content that struggles bears fruit with each passing moment, man finds his achievement is enhanced. In each and every expedition, man is disappointed in the very beginning. If he shows patience and bearance, his achievements prove to be astonishing. At times, he achieves such progress which he never imagined.

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